Social Science, Arts, Humanities                                                                    Spring, 2010

INTD339: Internship in Dramaturgy  (3,0)                                                        3 Credits

Prerequisites:   Permission of Dean

 

Instructor(s):         Instructor Name:  Robert Cooper                                                                    

           Office Number:  Arts Center, Room 225 

      Phone Number: 906-635-2275                       

      E-mail address:  rcooper@sympatico.ca        

Office Hours By appointment and at rehearsals.

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

 

4:00-5:00 pm

 

4:00-5:00 pm

 

 

Required Texts:        

            Romeo and Juliet, various editions

            Wright, E. A. Understanding Theatre Today. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1959

           

            Recommended Texts: 

Barba, Eugenio.  On Directing and Dramaturgy, Burning the House.

            Broadhurst, S.  Liminal Acts. A Critical Overview of Contemporary Performance and Theory.  Cassell, 1999.   

Bly, Mark, ed., The Production Notebooks, Vols. 1 and 2, Theatre Communications Group, 1995.

Cardullo, Bert, ed., What Is Dramaturgy? Peter Lang, 1995.

Counsell Colin and L Wolf, eds, Performance Analysis, Routledge, 2001.

Cremona, V. A. and P Eversmann e.a., eds, Theatrical Events: Borders – Dynamics – Frames, Rodopi, 2004.

Jonas, G Proehl, M Lupu, eds, Dramaturgy in American Theater: A Source Book, Harcourt Brace,1997.

Knowles, Ric.  Reading the Material Theatre, Cambridge UP, 2004

 

Course Description This course explores the theoretical role of the dramaturge, the art of dramaturgy, and the practical application of the tools of dramaturgy to a current production in rehearsal.

 

Course Goals This course should begin to prepare the student to competently perform the role of a dramaturge and critic as they contribute to the world of theatre generally and to the creation of living productions in rehearsal.

 

Course Objectives: At the conclusion of INTD339 students will:

 

1.   Be able to define “Theatre” and “Dramaturgy.”

2.   Be able to describe the criteria used to discuss and evaluate the main components of theatre.

3.   Be able to describe the role of the dramaturge and the processes by which dramaturgical decisions are made.

4.   Be able to analyze theatrical productions on stage, television, and/or film.

5.   Be able to write constructive reviews of local productions.

 

Grading Scale and Policies:

Point Values:

 

Exam                                                                                                                               20 %

Practical Contributions and Discussions                                                                         30 %

Reports and Assignments                                                                                               20 %

Essays (2)                                                                                                                         30%

                                                                                                                             Total 100 %

 

Grading Scale:

                        98-100             A+                               70-77               C

                        92-97               A                                 68-69               C-

90-91               A-                                66-67               D+

88-89               B+                               62-65               D

82-87               B                                 60-61               D-

80-81               B-                                0-59                 F

78-79               C+

 

            Ground Rules:

 

1.      Completing assignments on time and keeping up with the class material is important for success in this course and in college.  Late assignments will not be accepted except for legitimate pre-approved reasons as determined by the instructor.  Examples of legitimate reasons are:  severe illness, death in family, etc.

2.      Students are expected to perform all assigned work themselves.  Any form of cheating or plagiarism will be handled in accordance with the Honor Code Procedures.  Violations of the Honor Code may result in an F for the course grade.

3.      Use of head phones, cell phones and hats during exams is prohibited.

4.      Cell phones must be turn off for all class and lab sessions.  If the cell phone is on and rings, the student will be asked to leave the class for the day and this will count as an absence.

University Policies and Statements:

The Americans with Disabilities Act & Accommodations

 

In compliance with Lake Superior State University policies and equal access laws, disability-related accommodations or services are available to students with documented disabilities.

 

If you are a student with a disability and you think you may require accommodations you must register with Disability Services (DS), which is located in the KJS Library, Room 130, (906) 635-2355 or x2355 on campus.  DS will provide you with a letter of confirmation of your verified disability and authorize recommended accommodations.  This authorization must be presented to your instructor before any accommodations can be made.

 

Students who desire such services should meet with instructors in a timely manner, preferably during the first week of class, to discuss individual disability related needs. Any student who feels that an accommodation is needed – based on the impact of a disability – should meet with instructors privately to discuss specific needs.

 

IPASS (Individual Plan for Academic Student Success)

 

If at mid-term your grades reflect that you are at risk for failing some or all of your classes, you will be contacted by a representative of IPASS. The IPASS program is designed to help you gain control over your learning through pro-active communication and goal-setting, the development of intentional learning skills and study habits, and personal accountability. You may contact 635-2887 or email ipass@lssu.edu if you would like to sign up early in the semester or if you have any questions or concerns.

 

Tentative Course Outline

Session

Number

Week

Day

 

Date

Topic

Reading Assignment +

Assignment Due

Lecture

1

1

 

Jan 13

Introduction, expectations, evaluations, general discussion

List Pages to be Read

 

Lecture 2

2

 

Jan 20

Epistemology and how we arrive at decisions in theatre

Wright, 1 - 28

Blog*

Lecture 3

3

 

Jan 27

Plays and The Play Playwright

Wright, 29 - 65

Review #1

Lecture 4

4

 

Feb 3

Acting and the Actors

Wright, 66 - 100

 

Lecture

5

5

 

Feb 10

The Scene Designer

Wright, 101 - 113

 

Lecture

6

6

 

Feb 17

The Lighting Designer

Wright, 114 - 115

Checklist Due

Lecture

7

7

 

Feb 24

The Costume Designer

Wright, 116 - 117

Review #2

Lecture

8

8

 

Mar

10

The Music/Sound Designer,  Camera

Wright. 118 - 124

Essay #1 Due

Lecture

9

9

 

Mar 17

The Director

Wright, 125 - 153

 

Lecture

10

10

 

Mar 24

Romeo and Juliet  -  Showtime

 

 

Lecture

11

11

 

Mar 31

The Audience and the Critic

Wright, 154 - 170

Critique R & J Process

Lecture

12

12

 

Apr 7

Theories of Dramaturgy and Criticism

Reading List

 

Lecture

13

13

 

Apr 14

Theories of Dramaturgy and Criticism

Reading List

Essay #2 Due

Lecture

14

14

 

Apr 21

Review and Evaluation

 

 

 

Blog*  -  Weekly discussions of ideas related to theatre theory and to the rehearsal process of Romeo and Juliet.

+  Reading List will be augmented continually with selected readings from the Recommended Texts and other sources..