THEA251 History of Drama & Theatre I (3,0) 3

 

Prerequisites:          ENGL1501 or permission of the department

 

Instructor: Robert G. Cooper, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed.                                        

         705-945-8165                                      

         rcooper@algomau.ca                                

Office Hours:         By appointment or …  

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

 

     

 

 

Required Texts:     Brockett, O. and Hildy, F. J.   History of Theatre. 10th ed. Boston: Pearson, 2008.  Any edition will do.

Recommended Text:  Various scripts as found on the internet and in the library.

 

Course Description The study of historical and aesthetic drama and theatre from the Greek period to the European Renaissance.

         

          You will be encouraged to gather your impressions of the theatre by considering its historical development and evolution.  By reading and discussing drama, presenting in-class readings, viewing films (and hopefully live productions) we will explore the functions and roles of theatre.  It is expected that you will gain a greater appreciation for drama and theatre through an exploration of its historical context and therefore become a more sophisticated audience and critic with your increased discernment of what makes great theatre and how it developed.

 

Course GoalsTo offer a chronological survey of the theatre’s history as a cultural institution rather than an exhaustive analysis of any of its parts.  Emphasis will be on the European tradition.  Rationale:

This is part I (Origins to the Renaissance) of a theatre course which surveys historical and aesthetic drama and theatre from its beginnings to current theatre and drama. It is of necessity, therefore, not an intensive study of a single period, genre of theatre, or author.  That is the responsibility of other courses.

However, because this is a history of theatre and drama and because students will have different interests in theatre, some effort will be made to encourage students to develop an awareness of and interest in the general body of the theory of historical study as it pertains to theatre and dramatic presentations and literature.  Our intent is to foster in our students the ability to discuss theatre from an historical perspective and to explore ways in which theatre fits into the intellectual, sociological, political, psychological, etc. development of history and the human race.

So, students will be required to come to their own terms of understanding of unique pieces of theatre and theatrical movements, to develop their own frameworks for that understanding, and to engage in a dialogue with their colleagues as they come to terms with and explain their understanding. 

 

 

Course Objectives: At the conclusion of THEA251 students will:

 

1.  Develop an interest in the history of drama and theatre.

2.  Demonstrate an understanding that drama and theatre record the story of human experience.

3.  Demonstrate that they have read the classic authors, their plays, and criticisms of their creations.

4.  Exhibit a skill in interpreting and employing written and spoken language.

5.  Continue to develop and enhance their creative and critical thinking skills.

6.  Demonstrate an ability to write a thoughtful review/critique of a love performance.

7.  Demonstrate an ability to understand the political, cultural, and social contexts of drama.

8.  Participate in hands-on experiences in the areas of acting, production, and design.

 

Grading Scale and Policies:

Percentage Values:

 

Exams:  2@ 15% 30%
Reaction Papers 20%
Research Project 30%
Participation, Discussion, Scene Work, and Attendance 10%
Quizzes (Unannounced) 10%
Total 100%

 

        Grading Scale:

                    98-100          A+                          70-77            C

                    92-97            A                            68-69            C-

90-91            A-                           66-67            D+

88-89            B+                          62-65            D

82-87            B                            60-61            D-

80-81            B-                           0-59             F

78-79            C+

Ground Rules:

 

1.     Completing assignments on time and keeping up with the class material is important for success in this course and in college.  Late assignments will not be accepted except for legitimate pre-approved reasons as determined by the instructor.  Examples of legitimate reasons may include:  severe illness, death in family, family crisis, etc.

2.     Students are expected to perform all assigned work themselves.  Any form of cheating or plagiarism will be handled in accordance with the Honor Code Procedures.  Violations of the Honor Code may result in an F for the course grade.

3.     Use of head phones, cell phones, and the wearing of hats during exams is prohibited.

4.     Cell phones must be turn off for all class and lab sessions.  If the cell phone is on and rings, the student will be asked to leave the class for the day and this will count as an absence.

 

University Policies and Statements:  (Lake Superior State University_

The Americans with Disabilities Act & Accommodations

In compliance with Lake Superior State University policies and equal access laws, disability-related accommodations or services are available to students with documented disabilities.

If you are a student with a disability and you think you may require accommodations you must register with Disability Services (DS), which is located in the KJS Library, Room 130, (906) 635-2355 or x2355 on campus.  DS will provide you with a letter of confirmation of your verified disability and authorize recommended accommodations.  This authorization must be presented to your instructor before any accommodations can be made.

Students who desire such services should meet with instructors in a timely manner, preferably during the first week of class, to discuss individual disability related needs. Any student who feels that an accommodation is needed – based on the impact of a disability – should meet with instructors privately to discuss specific needs.

IPASS (Individual Plan for Academic Student Success)

If at mid-term your grades reflect that you are at risk for failing some or all of your classes, you will be contacted by a representative of IPASS. The IPASS program is designed to help you gain control over your learning through pro-active communication and goal-setting, the development of intentional learning skills and study habits, and personal accountability. You may contact 635-2887 or email ipass@lssu.edu if you would like to sign up early in the semester or if you have any questions or concerns


        Tentative Course Outline

Session

Number

Week

Day

 

Date

Topic

Reading Assignment

Assignment Due

1

1

T

8/31

Intros and expectations,

“Doing theatre history.”

B 8-9

 

2

1

R

9/2

Origins of theatre  -  theories.

Practical exercises.

B 1-8

 

 

2

T

9/7

Labour Day Recess

 

 

3

2

R

9/9

Present groupwork from weekend.            Discussions

 

Presentations

4

3

T

9/14

Greece  -  Aristotle 

 

B 10-32    Poetics

 

5

3

R

9/16

Greece  -  Aeschylus

The Persians

 

6

4

T

9/21

Greece  -  Sophocles

Oedipus Rex

 

7

4

R

9/23

Greece  -  Euripides

Medea

 

8

5

T

9/28

Greece  -  Medea Video

 

 

9

5

R

9/30

Greece  -  Medea video cont’d

 

 

10

6

T

10/5

Greek Comedy  -  Aristophanes

The Frogs

React. Paper

11

6

R

10/7

The Frogs                 (Broadway production)

 

 

12

7

T

10/12

Review

 

 

13

7

R

10/14

Mid-term Exam

 

Exam

14

8

T

10/19

Return Exam

 

 

15

8

R

10/21

Roman Theatre

B 33-67

 

16

9

T

10/26

Roman Comedy  -  Menander

 

 

17

9

R

10/28

Roman Comedy             Plautus and Terrence

Miles Gloriousus Aulularia

 

18

10

T

11/2

Roman Tragedy  -  Seneca

 

React. Paper

19

10

R

11/4

Middle Ages (c.  500 – 900)

B 69-103 Anon. - Querolus

 

20

11

T

11/9

Early Middle Ages (c. 900 – 1050)

 

 

21

11

R

11/11

High/Late Middle Ages   (c. 1050 – 1500)

Vitalis of Blois - Aulularia

 

22

12

T

11/16

Estates Satire               Chaucer (1343-1400)

Gower (1408-1408)

One of:

Canterbury Tales Friars

 

23

12

R

11/18

 

 

Everyman          (c. 1510)

React. Paper

24

13

T

11/23

Discuss Research Projects

 

 

 

13

R

11/25

Thanksgiving Break

 

 

25

14

T

11/30

Early Tudor

Gammar Gurton’s Needle

B 105-133   

Project       Final Draft

26

14

R

12/2

Shakespeare

 

 

27

15

 

12/7

Present Research Projects

 

Final Project

28

15

 

12/9

Present Research Projects

 

 

        

Topical Outline for THEA251     (3 credits)

Topic % of time spent
Theatre History Theory 11
Theatre of Greece 29
Theatre of Rome 14
Theatre of the Middle Ages 18
Theatre of the Early Renaissance 07
Student Presentations 10
Review and Testing 11
Total 100%